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US Economics Week Ahead: Jobs & the Fed

October 31st, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

With the first week of November comes a wave of important economic data—plus a few key earnings announcements—important macro releases include October’s employment report, an FOMC announcement, and several other indicators that will help gauge the health of the consumer and overall economy.  Also important to note is that the ECB, Bank of England, and Bank of Australia are all scheduled to make their own policy announcements next week, which could have some carry over into US markets.  On the earnings front, the market will be hearing from companies that include Cisco, Kraft Foods, Viacom, and Prudential.

Nevertheless, this week’s spotlight will be on Friday’s employment report, which is expected to show the unemployment rate moving from 9.8% to 9.9% with a decline in payrolls of -175K.  During the week it will be important for investors to watch the employment components of both the manufacturing and non-manufacturing ISM along with the ADP employment report for any clues towards Friday’s payroll numbers.  Any major swings in these indicators could shift expectations for Friday’s number and thus have a big impact on the day’s trading.

This Wednesday’s FOMC statement will undoubtedly receive immense scrutiny from investors looking for hints toward the timing of an eventual tightening cycle, however, as economic conditions have remained fairly static since the last meeting major changes are unlikely.  Other notable indicators include Monday’s motor vehicle sales and manufacturing ISM, Wednesday’s non-manufacturing ISM and Treasury refunding announcement, Thursday’s chain store sales and productivity, and Friday’s consumer credit report.

Here is the rest of this week’s US calendar:

Monday, Nov. 2

October’s Motor Vehicle Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): Car companies once again introduced strong incentives for the month to bring buyers back into the market after the expiration of the government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program, but sales should remain relatively subdued.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for domestic vehicle sales at an annualized pace of 7.3 million units compared to 6.7 million units in September.  August sales reached an annualized pace of 10 million units thanks to the ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program.

10:00 a.m. EST:  ISM Manufacturing Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): October’s ISM index should remain above 50 for the third consecutive month, despite likely remaining relatively unchanged from September’s release of 52.6.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a release of 53.0.  Investors will not only be paying close attention to the new orders index—previously 60.8—, but also the employment index—previously 46.2— for clues toward Friday’s employment report.  An ISM above 50 bodes well for the overall economy, and should place some upward momentum on industrial production.

10:00 a.m. EST:  September Construction Spending (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): According to the Bloomberg consensus survey construction spending is expected to fall -0.2% in September versus an increment of 0.8%in August.  Strong housing start data will likely place some momentum on residential construction while high commercial vacancy rates and lower government spending should more than offset these gains through government and public construction spending.

10:00 a.m. EST:  September’s Pending Home Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): Pending home sales rose 6.4% in August.  However, pending home sales could start facing some pressure over the coming months as the first time home buyer tax credit is presently set to expire on November 30th.

10:30 a.m. EST:  Daniel Tarullo, Federal Reserve Governor, is participating on a panel to discuss executive compensation at a University of Maryland event.

10:00 p.m. EST:  US Treasury 4Q09 Borrowing Requirements (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): The Treasury will release its borrowing estimates for the next two quarters.  Further details will be released in Wednesday’s refunding announcement.

Tuesday, Nov. 3

7:45 a.m. EST: ICSC-Goldman Store Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This weekly index tracks aggregate store sales across major US retailers, accounting for roughly 10% of total retail sales.  Given recent data supporting an increasing US saving rates and a worsening employment situation, this index could face some downward pressure.  Last week’s number indicated a weekly increment of 0.1% in store sales compared to a gain of 0.2% a week prior.

8:55 a.m. EST: Redbook (Risk: Negative, Market Reaction: Marginal): The Redbook is a weekly measurement of chain stores, discounters, and department store sales.  This indicator tends to be less significant than the ICSC-Goldman Store Sales in forecasting retail sales.  According to the Redbook store sales were rose 0.7% last week on a year over year basis.

10:00 a.m. EST:  Factory Orders (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): After falling -0.8% in August—on the back of weak durable goods—factory orders are expected to show at least a modest gain.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for an increment in September of 1.0%.  The advanced durable goods orders report indicated a 1.0% increment in September, which should place some upward momentum on September’s factory orders.

Wednesday, Nov. 4

7:00 a.m. EST: MBA Purchase Applications (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This index, which tracks new mortgage applications tends to be a reasonable forward looking indicator for home sales, but issues including customers filling out numerous applications could skew the index.  Last week’s data declined 12.3% after falling 13.7% a week prior possibly due to the upcoming expiration of the first time home buyer tax credit.  The refinance index fell 16.2%, while the purchase index fell 5.2%.

7:30 a.m. EST:  Challenger Job-Cut Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This index measures the number of announced corporate mass layoffs, but does not take into account the timing of the actual layoffs.  Meaning layoffs announced in October may not actually take place until September, or even take place slowly over an extended period of time.

8:15 a.m. EST:  ADP Employment Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): The ADP Employment report is considered a good window into Friday’s critical payroll number.  Any significant swings in this release combined with unexpected shifts in the manufacturing and non-manufacturing ISM employment indices could shift the consensus forecast for Friday’s employment release.

9:00 a.m. EST:  Treasury Refunding Announcement (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): According to the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association the Treasury will likely announce that it will issue $444.5 billion of marketable debt during the fourth quarter.  This would equate to a 13% jump from last quarter, but remain below the levels of fourth quarter 2008 as they were beginning to fund several new programs.  Treasury yields have the potential to creep higher over the coming months as additional supply hits the market.

10:00 a.m. EST:  October’s ISM Non-Manufacturing Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Like the manufacturing ISM, non-manufacturing ISM, should remain above 50, but be relatively unchanged on a month over month basis.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a reading of 51.9, versus 50.9 in September.  Again, investors will be paying close attention to the employment index for clues towards Friday’s employment report.  Also, it is important to look for any continued improvements in the new orders index that would confirm a continued upward trend for the index.

10:30 a.m. EST: EIA Petroleum Status Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): This report measures US domestic petroleum inventories.  Large unanticipated swings in this index could have a significant impact on energy prices.  Last week this report showed a rise of 0.8 million barrels versus an increment of 1.3 million barrels a week prior.

2:15 p.m. EST:  FOMC Announcement (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Investors will be analyzing the FOMC statement very closely for any indication of when they intend to begin tightening monetary policy or how they intend to withdraw quantitative easing.  Nevertheless, it is unlikely that November’s statement will express any significant changes versus the prior month, as economic conditions have remained somewhat static.  However, you can be sure the statement will be analyzed under a microscope for even the slightest hint of a shift in policy.

Thursday, Nov. 5

October Chain Store Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): US chain store sales were up 0.1% on a yearly basis in September, and could experience some modest gains in October.  Relatively strong performance in the ICSC-Goldman Sachs weekly chain store sales index should bode well for retailers, but numerous headwinds still exist, including a weak labor market and wavering consumer confidence reducing spending.  

October’s Monster Employment Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This survey conducted by Monster Worldwide Inc. measures online job demand.  According to last month’s national survey, “Despite recent improvements in economic sentiment, U.S. employers continue to exhibit caution when it comes to hiring,” said Jesse Harriott, senior vice president and chief knowledge officer at Monster Worldwide.“On the upside, demand for workers is firming in the blue-collar segment, with welcome signs of revived activity in construction and manufacturing.”

8:30 a.m. EST: Jobless Claims (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Initial claims fell last week by 1K to 530K, after falling 11K a week prior. Despite second derivative improvements these numbers still indicate further deterioration to upcoming payroll numbers, and the unemployment rate, which is very likely to exceed 10% in the coming months. The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is expecting a pullback in this week’s initial claims data to 523K from 530K—these numbers are still very high.

8:30 a.m. EST: Third Quarter 2009 Productivity and Costs (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Productivity gains continue to surprise to the upside as employers are able to gain more output from fewer employees.  Never before in history has productivity experienced such strong gains during a protracted economic downturn.  With that said the current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for third quarter productivity growth of 6.3%, compared to 6.6% during the second quarter.  A 6.3% rise in 3Q09 nonfarm business gross value add coupled with a what is a forecasted decline in nonfarm private sector hours worked helps support the case for strong productivity growth during the quarter.  Strong gains in productivity will likely cause employers to delay employers from hiring as they are now receiving more from less.

9:00 a.m. EST: RBC CASH index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): The Royal Bank of Canada’s Consumer Attitudes and Spending by Household (CASH) Index is a monthly measure of consumer attitudes toward investing, the economic outlook, and personal finances.  This index does hold some importance in so much that it tends to demonstrate a pretty significant correlation with the consumer sentiment index being released next week.

10:30 a.m. EST: EIA Natural Gas Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): This report highlights domestic natural gas inventories, which could have a significant impact on the energy sector.

4:30 p.m. EST: Fed Balance Sheet & Money Supply (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): Since the Fed’s shift to quantitative easing, the balance sheet has become one method to measure to the Fed’s effectiveness.  The market will pay close attention to the reserve bank credit component, which measures factors supplying   providing reserves into the banking system.  The Fed’s balance sheet again declined last week to US$2.144trn from US$2.183trn a week prior.    The fed’s balance sheet has slowly been shifting away from emergency lending facilities to Treasuries, agency debt, and mortgage-backed securities to help moderate long-term interest rates.

Friday, Nov. 6

8:30 a.m. EST: Employment Situation Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Very Significant): The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a decline in payrolls of -175, versus a decline of -263K in September, and an unemployment rate of 9.9% compared to 9.8% a month earlier.  October’s anticipated second derivative improvement in payrolls is partially due to expected improvements in September’s education components after strong losses last month. The unemployment rate will likely continue to rise—the consensus forecast range for October’s unemployment rate is 9.9% to 10.1%—and eventually peak above 10% next year.

10:00 a.m. EST: Wholesale Trade (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This indicator measure the level of inventories and sales by US wholesalers.  It is generally considered a good forward looking indicator toward trends in consumer behavior as stores typically ramp up inventories prior to any anticipated increment in sales.  It is important to note that this data is on a two month lag.

3:00 p.m. EST: September’s Consumer Credit Outstanding (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): After falling $12.0 billion in August consumer credit outstanding likely declined again during September with declines in both revolving and non-revolving credit.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a decline of US$10.0 billion.  This would be the eighth consecutive month of declines for consumer credit outstanding.  It is important to note that the monthly changes in this index have been quite volatile recently making it harder to calculate accurate forecast. 

3:00 p.m. EST:  Elizabeth Duke, Federal Reserve Governor, delivers the keynote address at the Chicago Fed’s annual Community Bankers Symposium.

Enjoy the weekend!

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This Morning’s Macro Recap: Income & Consumption, ECI, Chicago PMI, & Consumer Sentiment

October 30th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

Personal Income showed no change for September after a revised increment +0.1% in August, this was inline with the consensus forecast.  Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) declined -0.5% in September, versus a revised increment of +1.4% in August.  The decline in consumption is the continued aftereffects caused by the expiration of the US government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program’.  The program significantly bolstered sales during the months it was active, by at least partially,  leading some consumers–who would have been purchasing over the current months–to buy earlier in order to take advantage of the discount.  Additionally, relatively benign income growth over the past several months is unlikely to help catalyze any significant jump in consumer spending.   This data is indicative that the strong bounce in 3Q09’s personal consumption component of GDP will likely not be repeated in 4Q09.  The good news is that the inflation component of the report remains at relatively subdued levels.

October’s Chicago Purchasing Managers Index rose to 54.2 from 46.1 in September easily beating expectations.  The new orders index jumped to 61.4 in October from 46.3 in September, while the production index climbed to 63.9 in from 47.2. The employment index reported a modest decline to 38.3 October from 38.8 a month prior, while the prices paid component fell to 48.6 from 51.3.  A large jump in October’s new order index should bode well for the headline number next month.

October’s final University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index rose to 70.6 compared to a preliminary reading in October of 69.4; September’s final reading was 73.5.  This was essentially inline with expectations, but the fact that the final release declined from last month highlights the fact that consumers remain nervous, which will likely adversely impact the holiday shopping season.

In other news, the employment cost index rose 0.4% in 3Q09, which continues to indicate that wage pressure remains relatively benign.  This will not go unnoticed by the FOMC, who will likely keep their policy stance unchanged through most of 2010.

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Andy Xie: Central Banks, Arsonists and Playing with Fire

October 29th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

Here is another article by Andy Xie–always an interesting read–former Morgan Stanley economist, who predicted the credit crisis well before it came to fruition.  In this article Andy highlights how money supply growth is supporting a boom in asset prices, which in turn is bolstering the economy.  He goes on to compare central banks supplying money to ‘arsonists’ who have now ‘been asked to put out the fire’.   In conclusion he says:

A word of caution for all would-be speculators: You’ll want to run for your life as soon as the bond market takes a big fall. And the case for a double dip in 2010 is already strong. Inventory restocking and fiscal stimuli are behind the current economic recovery, and when these run out of steam next year, the odds are quite low that western consumers will take over. High unemployment rates will keep incomes too weak to support spending. And consumers are unlikely to borrow and spend again.

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Categories: Asia/China, Equity Markets, LATAM, US Tags:

Intraday Major Yen Divergence; Parallel Derisking In Process (From ZeroHedge)

October 29th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

If you enjoyed what I wrote yesterday on Japan and the Yen, you will likely enjoy this intraday update from Zero Hedge:

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/intraday-major-yen-divergence-parallel-derisking-process

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Categories: Asia/China Tags: , ,

GDP Back to Positive

October 29th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

The BEA’s advance estimate of 3Q GDP indicates that the economy grew at an for the first time since 2Q08 at annualized 3.5% pace.  The most surprising data from the report was a relatively robust increase in personal consumption which grew at 3.4% during the quarter–contributing 2.4% to the quarters 3.5% growth.  The primary driven behind consumption’s robust performance was likely fiscal stimulus, including  the US government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program.  As expected inventories declined by only -USD130.8bn compared to -USD160.2bn, which contributed 0.9% of the quarter’s growth.  Also of interest is the fact that residential investment for the first time since 4Q05 showed positive growth, gaining 23.3%.  But, given the temporary driver’s behind 3Q’s better than anticipated GDP report, and the numerous headwinds that remain in place for consumers, GDP growth should begin to diminish in the quarters ahead and eventually level off below trend–2.0%. Nevertheless, despite what will likely turn into sluggish growth next year, will still be positive and not negative as we have experienced over the last several quarters.

Source: BEA

Source: BEA

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Categories: Data Release, GDP, US Tags:

Positioning Yourself for Japan’s Potential Demise…

October 28th, 2009 Michael McDonough 5 comments

-Strong domestic demand for Japanese government bonds has permitted Japan to keep interest rates at or near 0 despite significant increases to the government’s debt burden, with no significant currency depreciation, and almost no economic growth. But, this model may be coming to an end

-An aging Japanese population will have several negative effects on the economy: 1) Higher taxes to fund the country’s pay as you go social security system. 2) Retirees will begin drawing from savings to fund retirements. & 3) Reduced demand for JGB’s will force the government to seek capital outside of Japan, which should lead to a run-up in rates. Any increase in interest rates should have substantial effects on the government’s ability to finance it’s debt.

-The ‘illusion’ of the YEN being a ‘safe-haven’ currency could soon dissipate. Not to mention the aforementioned issues, the bulk of Japan’s economic growth–and decline–has stemmed from the export sector. A strengthening Yen against its trading partners will add further pressure to this sector, and place additional pressure on Japan’s growth going forward.

Take a short position on the Yen versus USD:

*Buy USD/JPY puts

*Short YEN against USD (ETF: YCS)

Open a position to take advantage of anticipated rise in Japanese rates:

*Buy call options on Japanese yields

**For a more detailed look into this topic please see my column posted on TheStreet.com’s RealMoney section.

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New Homes Sales & Durable Goods

October 28th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

September’s new home sales came in at a disappointing seasonally adjusted annual rate of 402K units, compared to a revised pace of 417K a month prior.  In September the supply of new homes remained stable at 7.5 months. The median new home price increased by 2.5% to $204,800.  The reason for the decline can likely be attributed to a grouping of factors that include rising mortgage rates, weak labor market, and the waning effects of the first time home buyer tax credit set for expiration at the end of November–this will however likely be extended.

In other news, September’s durable goods orders rose 1.0% inline with the Bloomberg consensus estimate.  A rise in orders for defense aircraft more than offset a decline for civilian aircraft.  Overall this release continues to indicate the economy is in the midst of a modest recovery.

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Sprott Asset Management Raises Concerns Over US Government’s Financial Viability

October 27th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

In a monthly investment strategy letter written by Eric Sprott and David Franklin of Sprott Asset Management titled ‘Surreality Check… Dead Government Walking’ they convey their concerns over the US government’s ability to finance its growing burden.  In the letter they clearly state:

The United States Government is on a trajectory to default on their obligations. In its current financial condition, it will not be able to fund its forecasted budget deficits and unfunded Social Security and Medicare promises on top of its current debt obligations.

In a similar letter in 2007 Sprott warned of the eventual bankruptcy of GM along with the risks associated with Fannie, Freddie, and Citi.  Now, however, the company claims the risks have shift from the private sector to the government as it continues to assume more and more  financial liabilities.  As Sprott put  it:

It’s time for another surreality check, but this time it isn’t the publicly traded companies that deserve attention, it’s the governments that have saved them. Make no mistake-–the dead men are still walking-–they’re just a lot bigger now than they were two years ago, and they don’t generate earnings-– they print money and tax their citizens.

See the full letter here

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Consumer Confidence Hits 4 Month Low…

October 27th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

Source: Conference Board

Source: Conference Board

The Conference Board’s Consumer Confidence Index declined to 47.7 in October from a revised figure of 53.4.  This was well below the consensus forecast of 53.1, and the lwoest reading in four months.  The October Present Situation index came in at 20.7 compared to 23.0 in September, while the October Expectations index finished at 65.7 versus 73.7 in September. The driver behind October’s less than stellar performance is continued weakness in the labor market.

According to the Conference Board, “The short-term outlook has also grown more negative, as a greater proportion of consumers anticipate business and labor market conditions will worsen in the months ahead. Consumers also remain quite pessimistic about their future earnings, a sentiment that will likely constrain spending during the holidays.”

In other news, August’s Case Shiller HPI rose 1.2%, realizing its third consecutive month of gains.  On a year over year basis the index is now down 11.3% compared to 13.3% in June.  Home prices improved in all but one–Las Vegas–of the 20 cities included in the index.

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US Economics Week Ahead: The End is Near! (for the recession…)

October 24th, 2009 Michael McDonough Comments off

This week’s most important economic data will likely come in the form of third quarter 2009’s advanced estimate of GDP, which should put an end to four consecutive quarters of declines.  The U.S. government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program during the quarter should help to boost the personal consumption component of GDP, while inventories declining at a slower pace should provide a boost for that component.  Inventories do not need to turn positive to add to GDP they just need to fall at a slower pace.  Inventories are the difference between production and sales.  To highlight this point here is an excerpt from a recent Bank of America research report, “If my factory sells 10 wiggits per month, but is producing only 6 per month, then inventories fall by 4 per month. If sales stay at 10 and I want to slow the inventory depletion to 2 per month I need to raise production to 8.”

Also of note this week is September’s personal income and outlay data on Friday, which should show only a modest increase in income, while consumption should be down more significantly on the back of reduced auto sales stemming from the expiration of the U.S. government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program a month earlier.  Other indicators of note include Tuesday’s S&P Case Shiller HPI and consumer confidence, Wednesday’s durable goods orders and new home sales data, Thursday’s jobless claims release, and finally the Chicago PMI on Friday.

The coming week also brings the market its fair share of earnings releases with more than 25% of the S&P500 and four Dow components reporting.    Some major companies include Exxon Mobile, Chevron, Procter & Gamble, Visa, General Dynamics, Met Life, and Verizon to name a few. Fed speak is relatively light this week ahead of the November 3rd through 4th FOMC meeting.

Here is the rest of this week’s US calendar:

Monday, Oct. 26

8:30 a.m. EDT:  September’s Chicago Fed National Activity Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): The CFNAI is an index consisting of 85 separate data sets designed to encompass national economic activity and inflationary pressure. A reading of 0 indicates the economy is growing at the historical trend while a negative or positive result indicates the economy is growing below or above its historical average, respectively. Given the volatile nature of this index, the three-month moving average is typically quoted. This index remains somewhat obscure in the mainstream media and is likely to have a minimal impact on trading. This index has shown improvements over the preceding seven months and is expected to improve again in September from its reading of -0.9 in August.

10:30 a.m. EDT:  October’s Dallas Fed’s Texas Manufacturing Outlook (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This index is not highly publicized, and tracks manufacturing activity within the Dallas Feds jurisdiction.  Last month’s survey suggested “factory activity showed the first signs of bottoming out in September, according to the business executives responding to the Texas Manufacturing Outlook Survey. The production index, a key indicator of current manufacturing activity, came in close to zero as the number of companies seeing increases and decreases was nearly equal.”

Tuesday, Oct. 27

7:45 a.m. EDT: ICSC-Goldman Store Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This weekly index tracks aggregate store sales across major US retailers, accounting for roughly 10% of total retail sales.  Given recent data supporting an increasing US saving rates and a worsening employment situation, this index could face some downward pressure.  Last week’s number indicated a weekly increment of 0.2% in store sales compared to a gain of 0.6% a week prior.

8:55 a.m. EDT: Redbook (Risk: Negative, Market Reaction: Marginal): The Redbook is a weekly measurement of chain stores, discounters, and department store sales.  This indicator tends to be less significant than the ICSC-Goldman Store Sales in forecasting retail sales.  According to the Redbook store sales were rose 0.5% last week on a year over year basis.

9:00 a.m. EDT: August’s S&P Case Shiller Home Price Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): The S&P Case Shiller HPI has demonstrated three consecutive months of gains, but could face some pressure in August after a disappointing FHFA HPI release for the month.  Only three components (Detroit, Las Vegas & Seattle) of the 20 city index demonstrated monthly declines in July.

10:00 a.m. EDT: October’s Consumer Confidence (Risk: Downside, Market Reaction: Significant): Higher energy prices and continued uncertainty over the economic outlook could place some continued pressure on the Conference Board’s measure of consumer confidence.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a reading of 54.0, compared to 53.1 in September.

10:00 a.m. EDT: State Street Investor Confidence Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): The State Street Investor’s Confidence Index measures investors’ tolerance to risk. According to the State Street report, “After eight consecutive increases in Global Investor Confidence, which took the Index from an all-time low of 82.1 during the financial crisis to a five-year high of 122.8, institutional investors took a breather this month and consolidated their holdings of risky assets,” commented Froot. “This month’s reading of 118.1 is still comfortably in the range associated with the accumulation of risk exposures, as a reading of 100 signifies neither accumulation nor decumulation. However, there is a recognition that a portion of the recent rise in global equity prices can be attributed to liquidity expansion rather than fundamental opportunities. Institutional investors are pausing to assess this balance.”

10:00 a.m. EDT:  Richmond Fed’s Survey of Manufacturing Activity (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): The Richmond Fed manufacturing activity index has been in positive territory since May, and should remain there this month based on what has been a strong new orders component.   According to the survey in August, manufacturing activity rose signaling a solid third quarter, while the new orders and employment components both experienced growth, and the price index slipped.

Wednesday, Oct. 28

7:00 a.m. EDT: MBA Purchase Applications (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): This index, which tracks new mortgage applications tends to be a reasonable forward looking indicator for home sales, but issues including customers filling out numerous applications could skew the index.  Last week’s data declined 13.7% after falling 1.8% a week prior due to climbing interest rates.  The refinance index fell 16.8%, while the purchase index fell 7.6%. Refinances made up 65.0% of all applications last week.

8:30 a.m. EDT: September’s Durable Goods Orders (Risk: Downside, Market Reaction: Significant): A drop in aircraft orders from Boeing could place some negative pressure on the index, while an increment in auto orders for the month could help to offset some of the decline.    The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for an increase of 1.5%, after rallying 2.6% in August.  It will be important to monitor ex-transport orders, which tend to be less volatile, and were flat in August.

10:00 a.m. EDT: September’s New Home Sales (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): a 0.5% increment in housing starts for September  likely doesn’t bode well for the month’s new home sales data.  Nevertheless, the index should continue to rise, albeit at a slower pace.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for an increase to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 440K, compared to 429K in August.  Rising interests rates and the expected expiration of the first time home buyer tax credit may place some downward pressure on housing’s recovery.

10:30 a.m. EDT: EIA Petroleum Status Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): This report measures US domestic petroleum inventories.  Large unanticipated swings in this index could have a significant impact on energy prices.  Last week this report showed a rise of 1.3 million barrels versus an increment of 0.4 million barrels a week prior.

Thursday, Oct. 29

8:30 a.m. EDT: Jobless Claims (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Initial claims rose last week by 11K to 531K, after falling 10K a week prior. Despite second derivative improvements these numbers still indicate further deterioration to upcoming payroll numbers, and the unemployment rate, which is very likely to exceed 10% in the coming months. The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is expecting a pullback in this week’s initial claims data to 525K from 531K.

8:30 a.m. EDT: 3Q09 Advanced Estimate of GDP (Risk: Upside, Market Reaction: Significant): Easy monetary and fiscal policies coupled with a turn in the inventory cycle should bring GDP growth into positive territory for the first time five quarters.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for GDP growth of 3.0%.  The big test will be whether or not increments in final demand will be large enough to offset the eventual diminishing effects of fiscal and monetary policy over the coming quarters.

10:30 a.m. EDT: EIA Natural Gas Report (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): This report highlights domestic natural gas inventories, which could have a significant impact on the energy sector.

10:00 a.m. EDT:  October’s Kansas City Fed’s Survey of Manufacturers (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): According to the most recent survey, “Tenth District manufacturing activity rebounded in September as firms’ orders picked up slightly, and expectations mostly held steady with last month’s positive outlook. Most price indexes in the survey inched higher, but still remained at fairly low levels.”  I anticipate this trend will continue to August.

4:30 p.m. EDT: Fed Balance Sheet & Money Supply (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): Since the Fed’s shift to quantitative easing, the balance sheet has become one method to measure to the Fed’s effectiveness.  The market will pay close attention to the reserve bank credit component, which measures factors supplying   providing reserves into the banking system.  The Fed’s balance sheet again declined last week to US$2.183trn from US$2.174trn a week prior.  The main catalyst behind the rise was an increase in the holdings of Treasury and mortgage bonds.  The fed’s balance sheet has slowly been shifting away from emergency lending facilities to Treasuries, agency debt, and mortgage-backed securities to help moderate long-term interest rates.

Friday, Oct.30

8:30 a.m. EDT: September’s Personal Income & Outlays (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): Personal income likely experienced a modest gain during the month with the current Bloomberg consensus forecast indicating a gain of 0.0%. However, personal consumption during the month likely took a much larger hit primarily due to a reduction in car sales stemming from the expiration of the U.S. government’s ‘Cash for Clunkers’ program.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a decline of -0.5% for personal consumption.

8:30 a.m. EDT: Employment Cost Index (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): The current Bloomberg consensus forecast for the ECI is a quarter over quarter change of 0.5%, compared to a second quarter increment of 0.4%. This index should continue to confirm that over the near-term the risk of deflation continues to outweigh that of inflation. Weakness in the labor market combined with cost cutting, affecting benefits, should continue to place pressure on this index.  This index includes wages, salaries, and benefits.

*9:45 a.m. EDT: October’s Chicago PMI (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Moderate): The Chicago PMI measures business activity in the mid-West, and is released one business day prior to the national ISM index. *It is also important to note that the Chicago PMI is released several minutes early to subscribers of the service, so you could see reaction to the release starting at 9:42AM.  This index is considered a forward looking indicator to the national ISM, so any large unexpected shifts in the Chicago PMI could have an impact on trading.  The current Bloomberg consensus forecast is for a reading of 48.5, versus to 46.1 in September.  This index could face some negative pressure in October as its new orders index fell below 50 in September.  This index covers both the manufacturing and non-manufacturing sectors.

9:55 a.m. EDT: October’s Consumer Sentiment (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Significant): After a preliminary reading of 69.4 earlier this month—versus a final reading of 73.5 for September—, the Bloomberg consensus survey is anticipating a final reading of 70.0.  Looking back since June the preliminary number has been consistently revised up by the end of the month.

3:00 p.m. EDT: Farm Prices (Risk: Neutral, Market Reaction: Marginal): Given the relationship between farms prices and food prices, this index could have significant implications on future headline CPI.

Enjoy the weekend!

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